Knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices toward rodent-borne diseases in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania

Authors

  • Amina Issae African Centre of Excellence for Innovative Rodent Pest Management and Biosensor Technology Development, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro; Department of Wildlife Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro; Institute of Pest Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1691-0933
  • Augustino Chengula Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Biotechnology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro
  • Rose Kicheleri Department of Wildlife Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro
  • Christopher Kasanga Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Biotechnology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro
  • Abdul Katakweba African Centre of Excellence for Innovative Rodent Pest Management and Biosensor Technology Development, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro; Institute of Pest Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1483-3754

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2023.2385

Keywords:

Knowledge, attitude, practice, rodents, diseases, human wildlife, Ngorongoro

Abstract

In addition to their economic significance, rodents are hosts and transmit diseases. Most of rodent-borne diseases are endemic in rural Africa and sporadically lead to epidemics. Ngorongoro district is inhabited by humans, livestock, and wild animals. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward rodent-borne diseases among communities. The study used 3 focus groups, 20 key informant interviews, and the questionnaire (N=352) to collect data. The study found that 8.52% of respondents had good knowledge, 35.5% had a positive attitude and 94.3% had good practices toward rodent-borne diseases. The study revealed that only 28.13% of participants were aware of rodent-borne zoonoses. The majority of them (77.27%) believe that rodents are pests that destroy crops and do not transmit pathogens. Moreover, the results showed that the majority of them (82.9%) live in dilapidated huts that serve as rodent breeding places. Additionally, except for education and religion, the level of knowledge had no significant relationship with most of the participants’ demographic variables. When compared to individuals who didn’t attend school, those with secondary education (OR=7.96, CI=1.4-45.31, P=0.017) had greater knowledge of rodent-borne diseases and management. Similarly, to how attitude and practice were found to be considerably (r=0.3216, P=0.000) positively correlated, general knowledge and general practice scores were found to be significantly (r=0.1608, P=0.002) positively correlated. Despite showing good practices, the communities still lack knowledge of rodent-borne zoonosis. Rodent-borne disease education should be considered in Ngorongoro and other places.

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Author Biographies

Christopher Kasanga, Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Biotechnology, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro

Professor- Virologist

Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Biotechnology

Abdul Katakweba, African Centre of Excellence for Innovative Rodent Pest Management and Biosensor Technology Development, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro; Institute of Pest Management, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro

 

 

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Published

19-04-2023

How to Cite

Issae, A., Chengula, A., Kicheleri, R., Kasanga, C., & Katakweba, A. (2023). Knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices toward rodent-borne diseases in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania. Journal of Public Health in Africa, 14(6). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2023.2385

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Original Articles